Myths and legends lesson plans

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Myths and legends lesson plans

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If you are a paying subscriber we will be in touch shortly. All data held on the Storycreator2 application and associated registration data will be destroyed. E2BN would like to thank everyone who has used MuseumBox for their contributions and wishes you well with your future projects. This section provides access to a range of resources created or recommended by teachers for use in lessons. These have been categorised in to ' general resources '; i. A guide to using the Myths and Legends website is available in the General resources section below.

Shahnameh : an epic composed by the Iranian poet based on Indo-Iranian MythsText file The central collection of Persian mythology is the Shahnameh of Ferdowsi, written over a thousand years ago. Ferdowsi's work draws heavily, with attribution, on the stories and characters of Mazdaism and Zoroastrianism, not only from the Avesta, but from later texts such as the Bundahishn and the Denkard as well as many others.

A guide to using Myths and LegendsText fileText fileText fileText fileText file A downloadable word document which contains information on how to use the website and its associated tools. History mapping - skills gridText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file This is a skills grid that has been designed to show at a glance which historical skills could be developed by using each of the Myths and Legends.

History mapping - content gridText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file A content grid designed to show at a glance the content areas within the programmes of study at Key Stage Two and Key Stage Three History to which each of the Myths and Legends could be linked.

In some cases the link is very clear. In others it is a little more tenuous. Lesson ideas for using 10 of the stories in HistoryText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file This document outlines how 10 of the stories can be used within the History curriculum. The resource has been developed for myths and legends by Alf Wilkinson www. How to use Movie Maker 2Text fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file This guide has been produced to assist teachers and students wishing to create their own movies and perhaps use images, sounds and video clips from the E2BN Myths and Legends site and other archives to develop their own stories.

Storyboard templateText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file Myths and legends storyboard template than can be used for preparing animations, making movies or analysing stories.

Animating a myth part 1 - the storyboardText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file Lesson plan for using animation in the classroom - in 'animating a myth part 1', pupils choose an existing myth on the myths and legends website, analyse the story and then prepare it as a storyboard.

Animating a myth part 3 - creating the animationText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText fileText file Lesson plan for using animation in the classroom - in 'animating a myth part 3', pupils use the storyboard which they created in 'animating a myth part 1' and the characters and settings produced in 'animating a myth part 2' and turn them into a short animation using computer software.

Information is also available on the following topics: What are myths, legends and folktales? Why are they valuable in teaching and learning? How can they be used in the classroom? General Resources Shahnameh : an epic composed by the Iranian poet based on Indo-Iranian MythsText file The central collection of Persian mythology is the Shahnameh of Ferdowsi, written over a thousand years ago.Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter? All Categories. Grade Level. Resource Type. Log In Join Us. View Wish List View Cart. Results for myths and legends Sort by: Relevance. You Selected: Keyword myths and legends. Grades PreK. Other Not Grade Specific. Higher Education. Adult Education. Digital Resources for Students Google Apps.

Internet Activities. English Language Arts. Foreign Language. Social Studies - History. History World History. For All Subject Areas. See All Resource Types.

Spanish Myths and Legends Teacher Resources

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Wish List. Standards often require student exposure to a wide variety of genres. This resource fills critical gaps in 4th grade, 5th grade, 6th grade curriculum. Includes answer keys and graphic organizers. ActivitiesPrintablesGoogle Apps. Even better, you won't have to feel guilty that your students aren't learning while you are gone!

Foreign LanguageSpanish. WorksheetsActivitiesCultural Activities. Teach folktales and traditional tales: myths and fables, legends and tall tales, and fairy tales. The slides discuss differences between myths and legends, tall tales, fables, and fairy tales.Select and adapt these learning activities to best meet the needs of your students, and to fit the time available:.

Lessons for Teaching About Fables, Fairy Tales, Folktales, Legends, Myths, Tall Tales

Learning task 1. Learning task 2. Learning task 3. Learning task 4.

Myths and Legends

Students will brainstorm, draft their story, edit and proof read, teacher conference and publish their story. Students will use the information they have gathered from their retrieval chart and their reading log. These charts should demonstrate awareness of origins, differences and similarities of myths and legends.

The written text will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and the special features of myths and legends and the use of language used to convey a message.

myths and legends lesson plans

The race will start in the afternoon. Cat and Rat were very excited and trotted home hand in hand. When Cat and Rat reached home they just flopped into bed and fell asleep straight away. The day had come for the big race and Cat decided to take a nap just before the race. Before Cat went to have a nap he said to Rat "Could you please wake me up before the race begins?

Rat was busy getting dressed when suddenly he heard a big, loud announcement.

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There were twelve animals in the race including Rat. The race started. Rat wasn't a fast runner so he had an idea.

He jumped on Rabbit's back and jumped onto Monkey then with a great big jump passed the finish line. Rat had won the race. From that day Cats and Rats were enemies. Cat would never forget that day and will never forgive Rat. This student will continue to work within level 3. The focus for the teacher will be to encourage both oral and written development of language, the choice of words and phrases to describe feelings and perceptions.

Search all of TKI. Search community. Skip to content Search. Camp, Thrills, Spills and Chills Who? Myths and Legends. Relate the meanings of written texts to personal background knowledge and experience. Soon Cat woke up and when he heard that Rat had won, the race was over, he was furious.Looking for fun, hands-on science activities for your middle schooler?

Shop My Store. Greek and Norse Mythology were at the top of her list. I was not surprised. Teaching mythology in middle school and high school is a great way to get students interested in reading, writing, and researching ancient history. The cultures featured are:. Her vision is to improve on this one as well as create additional exhibits — one each for British, Greek, and Norse mythology.

This seemed like the perfect challenge for her and she was equally intrigued. She plans to take the exam in Homeschooled students are welcome to take the NME. Parents are expected to serve as proctors of the exam, following the same procedures lined out for regular classroom teachers. In preparation for the NME, I will continue to gather materials and resources for her. Some teachers use mythology as a stand-alone unit; other teachers have entire, year-long courses dedicated to the study of myths and legends from around the world.

This looks great Eva, what a fun study! I'm a former middle school science specialist who has embraced the independent nature of homeschooling.

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Travel and authentic learning experiences are important to us as a family. I hope you'll find encouragement and practical help here. Email address:. Like this: Like Loading About Eva Varga Eva is passionate about education. She has extensive experience in both formal and informal settings. She presently homeschools her two young children, teaches professional development courses through the Heritage Institute, and writes a middle level secular science curriculum called Science Logic.

In addition to her work in education, she is an athlete, competing in Masters swimming events and marathons. In her spare time she enjoys reading, traveling, learning new languages, and above all spending time with her family. Alternative Ideas for Homeschool Socials. My Homeschool Products.

Popular Content. Products We Love. When you make a purchase through that link, it generates a commission that helps support our efforts to maintain this website as a resource. Stay Connected:.Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter?

All Categories. Grade Level. Resource Type. Log In Join Us. View Wish List View Cart. Results for myths and legends lesson plan Sort by: Relevance. You Selected: Keyword myths and legends lesson plan. Grades PreK. Other Not Grade Specific. Higher Education. Adult Education. Digital Resources for Students Google Apps. Internet Activities. English Language Arts. Foreign Language. Social Studies - History. History World History. For All Subject Areas.

See All Resource Types. Standards often require student exposure to a wide variety of genres. This resource fills critical gaps in 4th grade, 5th grade, 6th grade curriculum. Includes answer keys and graphic organizers.They are tales told by the Blackfeet, Chippewa, and Cree tribes. These are mostly myths about nature and animals. Materials: Computer with Internet Access. Print outs of selected story for each student. Optional: Computer software program that allows students to create illustrations i.

Hyperstudio, KidPix, Print Shop, etc. Art materials for each group of 4 to share: poster paper, markers, crayons, scissors, glue, material scraps, etc. Computer Resources: While many configurations will work, we recommend: Modem: Browser: Netscape Navigator 3. Macintosh computer: System 7. Prior to the teaching, bookmark the Web sites that will be used in the lesson.

Load any plug-ins necessary to run the Web sites. This lesson provides a sample story, but feel free to find a legend that is indigenous to your geographic area. Introductory Activity: 1. Discuss myths and storytelling with your students.

Long before the Internet or television, oral storytelling used to be a form of great entertainment, and stories were often passed down from generation to generation. Ask them if they know any myths or stories that they could retell.

Ask them if they have ever heard their parents, their grandparents, or other older people sharing stories from their childhood. Do they remember being told stories when they were young? Steps Discuss the background of Native American myths and legends. Native American myths and legends were transmitted orally through countless generations by tribal storytellers. These stories are often about nature and the teachings of a tribe's forefathers. They are childlike and simple, often teaching the "whys" of the natural world.

Tribal storytellers framed stories to convey these explanations to others, and these stories were handed down from generation to generation.

myths and legends lesson plans

Read about traditional Cherokee storytelling as described by a Cherokee storyteller and share this example of one kind of Native American storytelling with your students.

The story provided in this lesson plan is an excerpt from an Ojibbeway legend. Ask the students to compare and contrast this story to those like the ones they discussed earlier. Introduce the students to the web sites that contain different Native American legends. Navigate through the sites so students become familiar with them. Divide students into groups of 4 and ask each group to pick a story from any of the web sites reviewed.

Students can pick myths or legends from tribes they are interested in or tribes from their geographic region. Have groups print out the stories from the web sites. Some suggestions are: Reenact the story in a skit or play.

Create paintings or illustrations that depict the story use traditional art materials or the computer - PowerPoint, Kid Pix, or any graphic program. Each group presents their stories to the rest of the class.Preinstructional Planning. During Instruction. Students learn the art of storytelling as they take a look at fairy tales and folktales.

The lesson includes telling stories out loud as well as writing them down. Students learn about myth, folktale, and fairy-tale genres with an online activity. Students compare and contrast the different genres of myths, folktales, and fairy tales. Students study the myth genre and make connections between their culture, myths, and history. This rich resource from Scholastic helps students learn about and write in the genres of myths, folktales, and fairy tales.

Writing workshops with professional authors are sure to fire up students' imaginations. Guide students through a fairy-tale genre study. By immersing themselves in the genre, students will determine why people tell such magical tales! Create a List. List Name Save. Rename this List. Rename this list. List Name Delete from selected List. Save to. Save to:. Save Create a List. Create a list.

myths and legends lesson plans

Save Back. The Teacher Store Cart. Checkout Now. About This Unit. Students will: Appreciate diverse cultures and traditions through folklore and folktales Compare historic world cultures with contemporary ones Demonstrate understanding of the genres by responding to questions Follow the writing process to create writing in different genres Identify unique characteristics of the genre: myth, folktale, folklore, and fairy tales Produce written work to show evidence of knowledge of the different genres Read and listen to genre examples to increase knowledge of genre characteristics Read myths and folktales to increase knowledge of world cultures and traditions Respond to questions about the folktale genre to demonstrate understanding Tell an original folktale to class members using appropriate fluency skills Use Web tools to access information about different cultures Use Web tools to write and publish original myths, folktales, and fairy tales.

Featured Lesson Plan.

myths and legends lesson plans

Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales for Grades K—3 Students learn the art of storytelling as they take a look at fairy tales and folktales. Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales for Grades 4—6 Students learn about myth, folktale, and fairy-tale genres with an online activity. Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales for Grades 7—9 Students compare and contrast the different genres of myths, folktales, and fairy tales.

Myths, Folktales, and Fairy Tales for Grades 10—12 Students study the myth genre and make connections between their culture, myths, and history. View not found. Download the PDF from here. Featured Activity. Featured Reproducibles. Setting the Stage. Venn Diagram. Related Subjects. Appears in These Collections.

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These materials will give students the means to develop as writers and publish their work. Grade s PreK


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